The Amazing Healing Power of Spiders Webs

The Amazing Healing Power of Spiders Webs

The wound healing properties of the spider web has been known for millennia. Used by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans as emergency field dressings for battle wounds they not only stop bleeding quickly but are antibacterial, speed up healing and even prevent scarring.

It is not so much the web in itself that heals, it is the silky thread. Even spiders that don’t weave webs produce silk as it is used for many purposes, including ‘drag lines’ which help the spider get around swiftly and safely and secure webs to surrounding structures.

abandoned web on a yew tree

abandoned web on a yew tree

The thread is made up of various proteins and is coated with a sticky cocktail as it leaves the spiders body, the stickiness designed to catch prey (look at the ‘cobwebs’ in your house and you will see how dust and airborne particles stick to them very efficiently, even clearing them off the duster is a bit of an effort). This sticky cocktail contains substances designed to prevent the web from fungal and bacterial deterioration which explains the antiseptic qualities when applied to wounds. It also contains vitamin K which is essential for blood clotting, hence the ability to staunch bleeding from wounds. The silk is also pretty much waterproof so forms a decent barrier over the wound, protecting it from further infection or damage.

The advise from those in the know is to use clean fresh webs if possible (but older abandoned ones may also suffice), checking that the spider has nipped off somewhere before collecting. It doesn’t have to a be an actual web, it can be any thread of spider silk, even cobwebs. Bundle the webs into a gauze like mass and spread over the wound.¬† You can hold the web dressing in place with a bandage or cloth or just leave it as is. The web dressing will dry quite hard¬† but can easily be washed of with warm water when healing is complete.

Some experiences of using webs as a wound dressing can be found here http://irishmedicalherbalist.blogspot.co.uk/2012/06/cobwebs.html and here http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/apply-spiderwebs-on-cuts-for-natural-wound-sealing-zmaz00aszgoe.

More recently researchers have been looking into various applications of spider webs in healing and medicine. The silky threads are (weight for weight) stronger than steel yet have much more elasticity. Various applications are being investigated, including for use in the repair of ruptured tendons, ligaments, nerve cells and as sutures. Spider silk also has the remarkable property of being accepted by the body with little or no immune response.

Spider webs have even been used in the past for painting on. Webs and silk were collected, squashed together, spread out and allowed to harden ready for painting on. Unbelievably, I even found an article about making bullet proof clothes out of genetically altered spider silk for combat purposes!

old abandoned webs on yew trunk

old abandoned webs on yew trunk

 

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Ground Ivy – humble champion of the ear, nose and throat

Ground Ivy – humble champion of the ear, nose and throat

This inconspicuous little plant packs a punch when it comes to clearing the ear, nose and throat of congestion and catarrh. It is extremely common in the UK and very easy to gather and use as medicine. Learn more http://www.thewildpharma.co.uk/plants/ground-ivy